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Is LA County Metro trying to create slums

An aerial view of a slum in Caracas

An aerial view of a slum in Caracas

An interesting article recently appeared on California Political Review and was authored by Stephen Frank.  The article discusses how Los Angeles County Metropolitan Authority aka LA County Metro, plans to utilize property they own that sits along rail lines.  Is Metro attempting to create slums?  Mr. Frank believes so.  Read for yourself.

L.A. Transportation Agency to Use Buses to Create Slum Housing Along Route

The stated goal of the Los Angeles County Transportation Authority is to create East Coast style slums, and forced folks to live in the “affordable housing”—in New York these systems are called slums. In Chicago they are called “subsidized housing.” Across the nation these facilities forced by government have the highest crime rate in the city, the worst schools in the community and a great place for chaos, drugs and depression.

“The agency, which runs buses and trains in the county, also owns real estate along transit lines. The Metro Board voted this week to adopt the new guidelines, with a goal of setting aside 35 percent of it’s total holdings for low-income residents.

The amendments to the so-called “Joint Development Program” would also encourage developers to build lower-priced units by allowing the agency to sell a portion of the property (up to 30 percent) at less than market value.

One way the authority is going to force this is by taking government transportation away from areas IT does not want you to live. Actually, that goes with the real goal—creating a Third World community—one where people are productive and can live without government assistance—and the other part of the community that only lives with government assistance. Which part of the community do you want to live in—government created slums or a vibrant and  free segment of the city?

LA’s transportation agency gets into housing with new development policy  by Meghan McCarty, KPCC, 7/24/15

The Los Angeles County Transportation Authority has adopted a new policy to encourage affordable housing on its properties.

The agency, which runs buses and trains in the county, also owns real estate along transit lines. The Metro Board voted this week to adopt the new guidelines, with a goal of setting aside 35 percent of it’s total holdings for low-income residents.

The amendments to the so-called “Joint Development Program” would also encourage developers to build lower-priced units by allowing the agency to sell a portion of the property (up to 30 percent) at less than market value.

The L.A. area is in the midst of a housing crisis. A Harvard study recently named the city the least affordable rental market in the country.

“Every single public and private entity who can assist in tackling that problem creatively, responsibly, prudently is obliged to do so,” said Metro Board Chair and L.A. County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas.

However, some members of the Metro Board, like Lakewood Council Member Diane DuBois, expressed misgivings about the agency’s involvement in the issue.

“We’re not a housing agency,” she said. “Our money is for transportation. We have to be careful that we don’t slip over into an area that is not our responsibility.”

Metro faces a looming budget deficit for operations of its many projects under construction and DuBois fears that giving up any revenue from properties would harm the agency in the future.

L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti, who also sits on the board, said developing affordable housing near transit would actually be good for the bottom line.

“A good policy will actually lead to more ridership, more tax revenue that funds us” he said, pointing to the success of developments around the Red Line in Hollywood that have built affordable housing and encouraged more residents to take transit.

About 80 percent of Metro’s riders are low-income with an average salary of $25,000 a year.

Several community organizations showed up at the meeting to express support for the new policy.

“If poor folks who depend on public transit can’t live near it then what’s the point,” said Carla de Paz with the East L.A. Community Corporation.

Currently about 31 percent of units on Metro’s properties are devoted to affordable housing – most of it created by the city’s Redevelopment Agency, which was dissolved by an order of Governor Jerry Brown in 2011.

The new policy formalizes a decision by the board in March to mandate affordable housing.


2 Responses so far.

  1. Pey-droh says:

    Did you know Mr. Frank is a conservative who is probably opposed to both public transit and affordable housing in any way, shape or form. Now if the transit was owned by the Koch brothers and if the housing was owned by Sheldon Adelson or some other Republican billionaire, he’d be all for it. Heck, he’d probably even be okay with Donald Sterling owning it.

    • Admin says:

      Thank you for the insight! This blog is intended to share information and learn from the comments. You never disappoint!

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